The first NCICL sponsored CLE was well attended and well recieved. The topics surrounding the constitutionaliy of ecomomic development incentives attracted participants from the private sector, local and state government and non-profits from across the state.

Scroll down to see photos of the Speakers and Participants
Click here to see the program outline.

Professor Peter Enrich of Northeastern University School of Law, opens the day with remarks on emerging trends with business-location tax incentives.
NCICL Executive Director, Robert F. Orr (in back) introduces Professor Richard Bowser (left) Diann L Smith (center) and Professor Peter Enrich (right), as they prepare to discuss the role of the Constitution's commerce clause in relation to the use of economic incentives by states.

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Diann L. Smith, General Counsel for the Council On State Taxation, responds to Professor Enrich.
Professor Richard Bowser of Campbell University Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, provides additional observations on Professor Enrich’s remarks.
The original venue for the CLE was changed to the Raleigh Country Club in order to accommodate the large number of registrants .
Former Justice Orr introduces Professor David M. Lawrence of the University of NC School of Government, Institute of Government and Ms.Dana Berliner, Senior Attorney at the Institute for Justice, Washington DC.

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Professor Lawrence addresses the North Carolina experience in the use of eminent domain for economic development
Ms. Dana Berliner just prior to her remarks on the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to review the case of Kelo v. City of New London, CT
William F. Maready, The Maready Law Offices, PLLC, participates in the panel discussion on the state constitutional regulation of economic develovment in NC
Ernest C. Pearson, of The Sanford Holshouser LLP and the Sanford Holhouser Business Development Group, prepares to respond William Maready's remarks.
Jack Holtzman, of the North Carolina Justice Center listens to a question from the audience on the public purpose clause of the N.C. Constitution.

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